Poland

Visit Pszczyna Castle – One of the Most Beautiful Castles in Poland

Last Updated on 26/04/2024 by kami

Pszczyna Castle is one of the most beautiful castles in Poland that still needs to be discovered by international visitors. The place is impressive not only from the outside but also inside, where most of the interior is original – something rather unusual in Polish castles and palaces after World War 2.

But the town of Pszczyna has more to offer, and in this article, you will find out why you should visit Pszczyna and what to see there. Read on and plan your trip to Pszczyna!

pszczyna castle poland

Where is Pszczyna

Pszczyna, a town of around 25 thousand inhabitants, is located in the southern part of Poland, not far from the border with the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Warsaw, the capital of Poland, is 340 km away from Pszczyna; Krakow is 90 km away, and Katowice, the capital of the region, is less than 40 km away.

pszczyna castle poland

Why visit Pszczyna

The main reason to visit Pszczyna is the castle, one of the most beautiful buildings of that kind, with around 70% of the interior being original from the times of the last owner (that’s very unusual in Poland).

But, since this is one of the oldest towns in Poland, there are so many more Pszczyna attractions that altogether will take you a solid few hours. There are historical buildings, interesting museums, a massive park and more. Pszczyna really has a lot to offer!

pszczyna castle poland

How to get to Pszczyna

Getting to Pszczyna is easy, with frequent direct trains from Katowice stopping in the town. You can also get here directly from Warsaw or abroad as international trains also stop here.

The train station, located in a nicely renovated historical building with a great cafe inside, is located some 20 minutes walking away from Pszczyna Castle.

pszczyna castle poland

A brief history of Pszczyna Castle

The famous Pszczyna Castle is, in fact, a palace. It was built in the place of the former fortified Gothic castle in the early 15th century, replacing the structure that was here since the 11th century. Over the years, the residence was rebuilt a few times in different styles: Renaissance, Baroque, and eventually French Baroque. The current neo-Baroque look dates back to the second half of the 19th century.

Just as the look of the place changed, so did its ownership. The castle was a residence of Silesian and Polish Piast dukes and nobles and, later, since the mid-16th century when it was sold, German noble families – Promnitz and Pless.

Over the centuries, numerous well-known figures, such as Baroque composer Georg Philipp Telemann or German Emperor William II, visited the palace. During World War 1, Pszczyna Castle became the Prussian command center between 1914 and 1917. After the last Prince of Pless died in 1936, Pszczyna Castle became state-owned property.

Pszczyna Castle is one of the most beautiful and important castles in Poland. Unlike many other historical places in the country, it wasn’t destroyed or plundered during World War 2, and you can still admire the original interior and details. Shortly after the war, on May 9th, 1946, Pszczyna Castle was open to visitors and has served its function ever since.

pszczyna castle poland

Visiting Pszczyna Castle

You need at least one hour to visit Pszczyna Castle, but most likely, you will spend more there, admiring each corner of the building and learning more about its history, importance, and all the valuables you can find inside. Around 70% of the items inside are original, left by the last owner – the Pless family.

The highlights of Pszczyna Palace are the living quarters from the 19th and early 20th centuries, including Emperor Wilhelm II’s apartment and the armory in the Gothic basement. You will surely be impressed with the grandness and splendor of the castle and how it was carefully designed to accommodate the needs of those who lived there (for example, the entrance to the castle was lined with wooden cubs to muffle the clatter of horses’ hooves so they would not disturb residents).

pszczyna castle poland

pszczyna castle poland

You will also quickly notice that hunting must have been a big passion of the castle owners – there are so many trophies and memorabilia in the castle, not only from Pszczyna and its surroundings but also from far away places.

pszczyna castle poland

pszczyna castle poland

The most amazing place in the whole palace is the Mirror Room, with high ceilings and rich decoration. This is where Georg Philipp Telemann used to give his concerts back in the 18th century. Still these days, each September, a music festival named after the famous German composer takes place here.

pszczyna castle poland

pszczyna castle poland

The Pszczyna Castle is open every day except for Mondays. On Tuesdays, the entrance is free of charge. Opening hours are: Tuesdays 10:00-15:00; Wednesday-Friday 09:00-17:00; Saturdays and Sundays 10:00-18:00; the last entry is one hour before the closing time.

The normal ticket currently costs 32 PLN; you need to pay extra for the armory (10 PLN), exhibitions (12 PLN), and stables (8 PLN, open only on the weekends). You can get the ticket online here or in the ticket office inside the castle. For an extra fee, you can also get the audioguide, which I recommend as it can be a great help with learning more about the castle and everything you see inside.

pszczyna castle poland

pszczyna castle poland

pszczyna castle poland

Once you are done visiting Pszczyna Castle and all it has to offer, be sure to walk around the beautiful (and enormous) park designed in the romantic style with numerous charming corners around – small ponds, picturesque bridges, and more.

pszczyna castle poland

pszczyna castle poland

Be sure to visit the stables too – the horses are long gone, but the building is impressive and often used for exhibitions too.

pszczyna castle poland

pszczyna castle poland

pszczyna castle poland

Once you get tired of all the wandering and exploring, you can relax in the tea house with a lovely view over the castle – the outdoor sitting is very tempting; you can spend way too much time here, simply enjoying the place.

pszczyna castle poland

pszczyna castle poland

There is also a bison farm at the park’s edge where you can see a few animals, including said bison. This place can be especially interesting for kids.

pszczyna castle poland

What else to see in Pszczyna

Pszczyna has more to offer than just the castle and its surroundings. The Market Square, dating back to medieval times, is surrounded by neatly restored townhouses, mostly from the 18th and 19th centuries. It is a vibrant place, with numerous cafes and restaurants, where locals and visitors mix, enjoying the small-town charm and lazy atmosphere.

pszczyna poland

pszczyna poland

The most popular photo spot here is Princess Daisy’s bench commemorating the English aristocrat Maria Teresa Oliwia Hochberg von Pless, who, in 1891, married John Henry XV, the owner of the Pszczyna castle.

pszczyna poland

Two of the most important buildings on the Market Square are the Town Hall and the Evangelical Church, literally glued to each other. While the church is fairly new, rebuilt in 1907 after the fire, the town hall is one of the oldest buildings in Pszczyna, with its ground floor dating back to 1658.

pszczyna poland

pszczyna poland

Many of the streets surrounding the Market Square are pedestrian, adding to the pleasant atmosphere of the place. There is also the famous umbrella street – Bankowa.

pszczyna poland

pszczyna poland

If you would like to learn more about printing, you can also visit the Silesian Press Museum; after all, in Pszczyna, the first Polish newspaper in Upper Silesia was printed in 1845. A bit further from the center (but close to the train station), you can also stop at the open-air ethnographic museum with a few wooden buildings from the region – the oldest is from 1784.

pszczyna poland

Where to go next

There are so many interesting places near Pszczyna that you can easily combine into a nice itinerary to explore Southern Poland (as well as the Czech Republic and/or Slovakia – both are not too far).

Only 20 km from Pszczyna, you can visit Auschwitz – this former Nazi Concentration Camp does not need a further explanation.

Going south from Pszczyna, you should stop in Bielsko-Biala (often called “a little Vienna” for its architecture and interesting history) and Cieszyn – one of my favorite places to visit in Poland, a Central Europe in a nutshell. You are also very close to Beskidy mountains with its hiking trails and beautiful views.

Going north, you can explore the industrial past of the region in Katowice and beyond. And these are only a few suggestions; this part of Poland is packed with attractions yet is still widely underrated!

Further reading

I published many articles about Poland that you might find useful when planning your trip there. Here are some of them:

If you are looking for articles about a specific destination – check out the map with all the articles I’ve published (and their locations). You can also join my Facebook group about traveling in Central Europe and ask your questions there.


Travel Resources

You can find the best accommodation options at Booking. They have many discounts and excellent customer service. Click here to look for the place to stay in Poland

Never travel without travel insurance, you never know what might happen and better safe than sorry. You can check the insurance policy for Poland here.

I recommend joining organized tours to get to know the place better and to visit more places during your trip. You can find a great selection of tours at Get Your Guide – click here.

Make sure to have the offline map always installed on your phone, they can save you so many troubles. I always use the free app Maps.Me.


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pszczyna castle poland


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